Blog

Render Pool BLOG

We’ve pointed out in the past about how locally rendering 2D or 3D projects for animation and film is a very time-consuming and computation-intensive process. When either using unoptimized geometry in scenes or polygon-heavy models in your final render, variables such as these and more will ultimately increase the amount of time and processor power

Most large-scale animated films are produced with larger VFX departments but rendered using cloud-based rendering services. Films like Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse are a good example of the amazing visual effects that modern 3D animation has to offer. However, the amount of data it takes to produce a film of that scale can take months

Including animation, graphic design, film editing, and post-production, Blender has a seemingly endless list of applications. With the advent of social media, motion graphic design is more common and more sought after than ever before. For example, what if you want to make a simple border animation for a logo or a title card? Though

In this article, we will explain the basics of how to properly export and archive your final scene in Blender while using the RPR format, which can then be uploaded to Render Pool — a cloud-based render farm that can render your scenes and animations quickly and efficiently, maximizing your output and workflow while saving

With 3D viewports, such as Blender’s Eevee, you can achieve a viewport render that primarily uses the GPU for optimal performance and lightning speed in both the viewport and the final render, whereas Cycles, Blender’s internal ray tracing engine, focuses on the physically accurate portrayals of light and shadow, which can cause slow rendering times

If you’re in Blender’s rendered shading mode and have highly complex objects and materials in the 3D viewport, you may notice that your machine’s performance takes a bit of a dive and the visualization process is substantially slower. The question is: If you’re only interested in rendering a specific area, how do you go about

When the hard part of designing and lighting your scene is complete, the next and sometimes harder step for many aspiring 3D artists is setting up the shader materials for a model. Many artists can rely on the Principled BSDF shader for solid colors and simple kinds of surfaces, or create UV maps using third-party

Has this happened to you? For one reason or another, Blender encounters an error and suddenly has to close, but you haven’t saved your progress before it crashes. Or your mind wanders, and you close the program before saving. What happens to the file and all the hard work you have put into your scene?

The image format that you choose for your render can greatly change the way your final product will look. Images can be compressed to save disk space with lossy formats, while lossless formats sacrifice space for quality and fewer encoding artifacts. So, which is the right way to go about rendering your image? First, it’s